Boeing, FAA Share Blame in Certification of the 737 Max

In this April 10, 2019 photo, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 airplane being built for India-based Jet Airways lands following a test flight at Boeing Field in Seattle. Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration are both partly at fault for the failures of the 737 Max, the plane model involved in two fatal crashes, according to a new report. The New York Times said Friday, Oct. 11 that a multiagency task force found that Boeing didn’t appropriately explain the plane’s new automated system to regulators, and the FAA didn’t have the capability to effectively analyze much of what Boeing did share about the plane. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — Boeing did not fully explain to federal regulators an automated flight system featured in its new 737 Max, and those regulators didn’t have the capability to effectively analyze much of what Boeing did share about the plane.

Those are the findings of a multiagency task force due to release its findings Friday, according to a report in The New York Times.

The Boeing 737 Max was grounded following crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia that killed a total of 346 people late last year.

The task force only looked at the Federal Aviation Administration’s certification of the Max’s flight control system, but that allowed it to review the certification of the new automated system involved in the crashes.

The New York Times received a draft copy of the task force’s report.

 

Source: AP

Categories: Aviation/Travel, Today’s Business News

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