Federal Funding Approved for USACE Feasibility Study of Possible Corps Flood Control Projects in St. Tammany

MANDEVILLE, La. — Pat Brister, St. Tammany Parish President, and U.S. Congressman Steve Scalise, announced today that a long-standing request of the Federal Government for a feasibility study by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) of St. Tammany Parish, has now been funded. According to a press release, the study will open the doors for the USACE to determine how they can best implement flood, shoreline protection, and ecosystem restoration measures in St. Tammany.

Scalise, a persistent proponent of the study, has touted its benefits and stressed its importance, as he continually pushed for its funding, ever since the request by St. Tammany was made in the Water Resources Development Act of 2016, or WRDA Bill.

“The $3 million in funding we obtained for the St. Tammany flood reduction study is a big win in our fight to protect communities throughout the Northshore from flooding. This is a top priority of mine, and I will continue to work closely with the Corps to ensure timely delivery of the study’s findings,” said Congressman Steve Scalise.

The $3 million in immediate funding was approved by the White House Office of Management and Budget and USACE Headquarters, to begin the storm and flood reduction study on the St. Tammany Parish Government Coastal Master Plan, laid out in the 2016 WRDA Bill. The WDRA Bill allows the USACE to provide technical assistance to non-federal entities for site-specific activities, including feasibility studies of proposed water resources development projects.

“This is exciting news for many reasons. This study is the first step in determining how our Comprehensive Coastal Master Plan can be best executed to achieve the highest possible return on our flood, coastal protection, and ecosystem restoration initiatives,” said Brister. “We owe much of this to the efforts of Congressman Scalise, and his determination to assist us in making this a reality. We have seen many areas of Southeast Louisiana receive much needed work by the Corps of Engineers, and we will now see a study begin in St. Tammany. With that comes the strong hope of seeing concrete recommendations for realistic flood control work by the Corps.”

 

 

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