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Tribe Challenges Corps Findings on Dakota Access Pipeline



In this Oct. 5, 2016, file photo, heavy equipment is seen at a site where sections of the Dakota Access pipeline were being buried near the town of St. Anthony in Morton County, N.D. The Standing Rock Sioux is challenging new government conclusions that the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline poses no significant environmental threats to American Indian tribes in the Dakotas. The Army Corps of Engineers in August finished more than a year of additional study ordered by a federal judge.

Photo by Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Standing Rock Sioux is challenging new government conclusions that the $3.8 billion Dakota Access oil pipeline poses no significant environmental threats to American Indian tribes in the Dakotas.

The Army Corps of Engineers in August finished more than a year of additional study ordered by a federal judge. The agency said the work substantiated its earlier determination that the chance of an oil spill is low and that minority and low-income populations aren't at greater risk.

Standing Rock is leading a lawsuit against the pipeline built by Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners and wants a federal judge to reject the findings. The tribe says the Corps didn't adequately consider information that undermines the agency's conclusions.

The four-state pipeline has been moving North Dakota oil to Illinois since June 2017.

 

By AP reporter Blake Nicholson

 

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